Eat Healthy With Your Own Organic Garden

You know how to garden pretty well, and you have a rough idea of what it takes to consider something to be be organically grown, however you do not know exactly what organic gardening is. This article will break it down for you easily and help to clear up any confusion that you may have.

When you buy seeds for your garden, be sure to purchase seeds that are labeled “certified organic.” This ensures that your plants will be organic throughout their lifespan and that the seeds you are buying aren’t contaminated with chemical fertilizers or pesticides. Watch out for labels, such as “genetically engineered” or any mention of “natural” that does not include the phrase “certified organic.”

A great first step to having a successful organic garden is to test the acidity of the soil in your garden. The ideal number is 6.5, if your soil is on the low end, it’s too acidic and if it’s on the high end it’s too alkaline. Neither of those situations lends itself to a successful garden. So by purchasing a soil testing kit before planting, you will assure yourself a beautiful organic garden in the summer.

To be as efficient as possible in the garden, always have your tools handy. You should use a large pail and wear sturdy pants that have several pockets. You will be much more productive if you can quickly get to your spade, pruning shears, trowel and watering can.

Take steps to protect earthworms in your organic garden. Till your soil minimally, as tilling can kill earthworms. The best tilling depth is 3 to 5 inches. Avoid using chemical fertilizers because they harm the micro-organisms in the soil, decreasing earthworm activity. Be sure that the soil never dries out too much, but at the same time avoid over-watering. By maintaining these soil conditions, you will notice your earthworm population increasing rapidly!

Sometimes when you are growing vegetables or fruits, it can be helpful to cut off newly formed buds or other non-fruit bearing areas. This will stimulate the growth of heavier fruit because the plant re-routes nutrients to where its growth should be navigating. When taking care your garden, it’s important to make the distinction between harvesting the plant, or encouraging its growth.

A great tip when starting your own organic garden is to always space your seeds in the mix as evenly as you can. If you do this, it will ensure that every single one of your seeds has an equal amount of room to grow in the most optimum way.

Choose a site for fruit trees depending on their specific requirements. Most fruit trees require 8 hours of sun per day. Morning sun is important, as it dries dew rapidly, helping to prevent fungus. Avoid planting fruit trees in a low spot in the garden where frost or cold air can collect. Some fruit trees are especially susceptible to late frost damage, and are better planted on a north-facing slope. This is especially true for peach, plum, cherry and apricot trees.

Planting cover crops is important to maintain a good quality soil. By protecting the soil with cover crops, it will be immune against weeds, be more fertile, have less water and wind erosion, and have better water drainage. Clover, fava beans, and buckwheat are all fantastic for cover cropping.

An important tip for organic gardening that will naturally help prevent disease from appearing in your plants is to move your plants to different spots of your garden each year. This will keep any disease from spreading because the soil doesn’t build up harmful organisms from planting in the same spot each year.

If organic gardening is something that you are interested in, make sure you do your research. There are so many resources available in print and also on the internet. Find out what you need to get started in your organic gardening ventures. It can be fun and rewarding in the end.

When watering your tomatoes in your organic garden, you should always water them on the soil instead of the leaves. When you water the soil, the water goes down into the roots. The roots are the parts of the plant that need water and other nutrients. If you water the leaves, the water will not be able to get into the roots.

Soaker hoses can make an outstanding addition to almost any organic garden. Soaker hoses allow the gardener to provide low-pressure watering over long periods of time to the plants that need it. When they take the place of hours of fussy hand-watering, such hoses are well worth the investment the gardener makes in them.

In conclusion, you came into this article wondering exactly what organic gardening was and now, you should have a pretty clear idea of what it is. Hopefully, this new knowledge will help you not only to expand your garden, but also allow you to share this information with people who have the same interests.

4 thoughts on “Eat Healthy With Your Own Organic Garden”

  1. When running your organic garden, you should use the “shovel method” to eliminate weeds. This method does not eliminate all of the weeds at one time because doing this is ineffective. This method uses a sharp spade to turn the weeds over and bury the leaves. When the leaves rot, the weeds will actually provide nourishment to the soil.

  2. Water your plants during the morning to avoid having fungal growth that generally prefers moisture and darkness. By watering your plants during the day they are best able to take advantage of the sun, and utilize the suns anti-bacterial effects. Some bacteria or fungi are light sensitive, so by watering during the day you benefit the plant by reducing the growth potential of its competitors.

  3. Use compost in your garden. Compost balances both acid and alkaline soils, bringing PH levels into the optimum range for nutrient availability. It contains micronutrients such as iron and manganese that are often absent in synthetic fertilizers. Compost also feeds diverse life in the soil, including bacteria, insects, worms, and more, which support plant growth.

  4. Never use ‘unfinished’ compost in your garden. Unfinished, meaning still ‘hot’ compost can burn plants or bulbs if you try to amend your soil. An excessive smell of ammonia means that the compost hasn’t broken down sufficiently. You can work unfinished compost into a patch of bare soil, but be careful not to plant anything in the area for at least one week.

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