Love Gardening? Try These Organic Gardening Tips

When you think of organic gardening, do you just see it as something that takes a long time to grow without pesticides? If so, then you have a very narrow view of the subject. Organic gardening is so much more than that and it can be personalized so that it works for you. Read on to find out how.

Water your organic garden with storm water runoffs and collected rainwater. Rainwater is more pure and better for plants than home tap water, because it won’t contain chemicals such as chlorine or fluoride. Using rainwater also helps in reducing your overall water usage. Rainwater can even be stored in barrels or cisterns to be used during dry spells.

It is important to rotate your organic plants regularly when you are attempting to grow an indoor garden. Plants bend toward wherever a light source is. If you do not rotate your plants there is a good chance that they will all bend toward one side which will limit the amount of vegetables that grow on the plants.

A great tip when participating in organic gardening is to always wash your containers. This is needed so that you will protect your plants from getting any diseases. You should wash them in warm, soapy water, and then rinse using a diluted solution of bleach and water. This will ensure that your plants stay healthy.

Manage your garden hose to prevent frustration. Garden hoses, especially longer or heavy duty ones, can become unwieldy and annoying when you have to drag them around the garden, all twisted up. Invest in a portable hose reel or a stationary one, depending on your garden configuration, to more easily manage your garden hose and make storing it fast and easy.

Plant ornamental, edible plants as part of your regular yard landscaping. Good plants to start with include rosemary, thyme varieties, sages, oregano and basil. These all look great mixed with perennials, and they will supply you with enough that you won’t need to purchase them anymore – herbs are expensive at the supermarket.

Don’t harm your native critters. Some animals can naturally keep the bug population down; one such example of a good pest-predator is the bat. Bats are well-known for being bug consumers. Since your garden may sometimes look like a tasty treat to these tiny critters, having bats around can help reduce their population naturally, without the usage of harmful pesticides.

If you plan on starting an organic garden, you should always properly cover your seeds. If your seeds are not properly covered, then they will not grow. You should aim to cover most of your seeds about three times as deep as the thickness of your seeds in order to ensure optimum growth. However, certain seeds, such as alyssum and snapdragons, should not be covered because they need a lot of light to germinate.

If your organic garden uses containers, you may need to swap seedlings to larger containers as they outgrow them. When you do this, make sure to handle the seedlings by the leaves and roots. To be more specific, you should avoid touching the stems as they are extremely fragile and can be easily damaged. After you have swapped containers, it is recommended to water the roots as this will help them merge with their new environment.

The best way to weed your organic garden is the old-fashioned way, pulling the weeds out by hand. Even though organic herbicides sold at the store are tempting, they aren’t nearly as effective as getting on your hands and knees and pulling the weeds out by hand. It’s also very invigorating to do it yourself. It gives you a sense of accomplishment.

For indoor organic gardening, temperature control is very important during the early phases. Seventy degrees Fahrenheit is the ideal temperature for most seeds to start growing. You can achieve this temperature relatively easily by installing heaters and placing the seeds near the vents. You can also purchase heat mats to place under your plant containers.

If you are new to organic gardening, start with disease resistant plants. Some plants are just hardier than others and because of this they will require less maintenance. A plant that survives well on its own will encourage you in continuing your organic gardening practices. Ask at your local garden store, as different varieties are hardy in different areas of the country.

When first growing a plant you should make sure that it has all the nutrition and water that it needs. The sprouting stage for most plants is the time when it is most vulnerable to drying out or dying. With proper care, a sprout will mature into a full adult plant which is much more resistant to environmental and animal threats.

After reading through all of that, do you still see organic gardening in the same way? Do you now see that it is so much more than a pesticide-free garden? The work involved is not too bad, but it will take effort and patience to grow an organic garden of your own.

3 thoughts on “Love Gardening? Try These Organic Gardening Tips”

  1. Stay shallow in the soil when you are working it. You do not need to break your back digging deep in your organic garden. Keep your depth to an average of six inches. Nearly eighty-five percent of all plant roots only require the top six inches of soil. That should make your work easier.

  2. You don’t just have to plant things that are going to be eaten by you in your organic garden. Try planting some flowers too. You can use annuals for one-season color. You do not want to use everywhere though since replacing a lot of them can be very expensive. Try planting them in a few small areas.

  3. Eliminate the need for excessive intervention in the health and care of your landscaping and gardening plants by choosing shrubs, grasses, and veggies that require a bare minimum maintenance. These plants are often easily identifiable by their smaller taproots and undersized, silvery colored leaves. Plants that work well with their environment require very little in the way of fertilizers and pesticides.

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