Organic Gardening Tips That Will Help You Grow Better Food

So you want to try your hand at organic gardening? Do you know anything about this type of gardening? Do you know about all of the different kinds of seeds and tools that you can use? If these questions raise more questions than you can answer, try looking at the tips below.

When you buy seeds for your garden, be sure to purchase seeds that are labeled “certified organic.” This ensures that your plants will be organic throughout their lifespan and that the seeds you are buying aren’t contaminated with chemical fertilizers or pesticides. Watch out for labels, such as “genetically engineered” or any mention of “natural” that does not include the phrase “certified organic.”

When starting your organic garden, a great tip is to make sure you have the right timing when sowing your seeds. If your timing is off when planting a particular plant, you will have very disappointing results. If you make sure you have your timing correct, you will likely be pleased with your results.

Your plants need to grow in a rich soil. You can buy bags of soil but they can be quite expensive. You can also easily create your own: you need to use perlite, vermiculite and peat in equal quantities. You should also add a small quantity of lime and compost if needed.

Make sure your seeds have enough room to grow. It is fine to have many seeds in one container before they sprout, but you will have to replant them as they grow. Use containers that are actually big enough for one plant, and avoid having more than one plant in each container.

Are you busy with your organic garden? Remember, before you replant your flowers or vegetables outside in cooler weather, you need to get them ready for the change in temperature and light! For a few weeks, move your plants to a colder spot with no light for a few hours. Gradually increase the amount of time you leave your plants in the cold. After a few weeks, your plants should be ready for the cooler outdoors.

Rotate your crops to prevent permanent populations of pests in your garden. As with any ecosystem, pests need a certain amount of time to nest and build up a proper population within a garden. These pests are specially suited for one environment and one food source. By switching their food source you can essentially keep your pest population down simply because they are unable to adapt to the new type of plant.

If your backyard soil isn’t conducive to an organic garden, try installing a raised bed. Within the raised bed, you can create your own mix of soil and compost to achieve the ideal soil for raising your crops. Just be sure the bed is at least 16 inches high so that roots have room to flourish.

If you have low-growing weeds, such as lamium or chickweed, use a fast method to remove them. If your weeds have grown into a mat, you can use a sharp spade to slice beneath the weeds. Once the weeds are cut, you should turn them over which will bury the leaves. The leaves will rot and nourish your soil.

Any organic gardening project is immediately susceptible to fungal diseases that can rot and ruin your seeds or seedlings before they even have a chance to grow. In order to prevent this, you should use sphagnum moss which acts as a natural fungicide. When your seeds are planted into the soil, apply the moss immediately after planting. On the other hand, if your seeds are exposed to sunlight, you should apply the moss first, and then deposit the seeds on the moss. You only need to use a sprinkle of moss.

If you have plants that love acid in your organic garden, especially tomato plants, then coffee grounds make great mulch. It’s simple to scatter the coffee grounds around your plants and then sit back and let the high levels of nitrogen help your acid-loving plants grow to great heights all summer long.

To keep dirt from getting stuck in the leaves of lettuce and other leafy vegetables, use mulch. When the plants appear, spread an inch or two of mulch around the base of the plants. This will prevent dirt from getting into the plant and also help prevent pesky weeds. Just be sure that the mulch is organic and untreated by pesticides.

When you are digging holes in your yard in which to plant shrubs, bushes, or trees, do not make it perfect. Holes with perfect sides will actually work against you by restricting plant growth. The roots cannot penetrate the sheer face made by a shovel.

Do you now understand what makes organic gardening great? Do you know about seeds and tools and how to use them? If you have an idea of how to answer these questions, then you have read and understood what it takes to become a better and smarter organic gardener.

5 thoughts on “Organic Gardening Tips That Will Help You Grow Better Food”

  1. In order to offer your organic gardening the most success, mulch it with 3 inches of organic material. By mulching your organic garden you will conserve water, add nutrients to the soil and stop weeds from growing. As an added bonus, mulching also gives your organic garden a bit of beauty.

  2. If you are wanting to start your own organic garden, it is crucial that you know how to properly make beds. To do this, slice under the turf with a space. Once you do this, flip it upside down and cover this area with around three or four inches of wood chips. After a few weeks, you can cut in it and plant.

  3. Maintain your soil with kitchen ingredients. If you don’t have a compost pile, you can amend your soil by using ingredients from the kitchen. For example, finely chopped up boiled veggie scraps, eggshells or fruit peel can be worked into the soil to provide essential minerals. Coffee grounds work particularly well around plants such as rhodies and azaleas, and the remaining water after boiling eggs is full of calcium that will give a boost to any plant.

  4. The best time to pick most home-grown herbs is at the break of dawn in the morning when you see dew on the plants. Picking the youngest shoots give the best flavor and helps keep the plant pruned. Most herbs can be frozen in zipped plastic bags and will keep fine for up to six months.

  5. Use untreated wood, stone, or brick to build a raised bed. If you use wood, be sure that it is untreated and naturally rot resistant. Good choices are cypress, cedar and locust. In a vegetable garden, never use treated wood, as the chemicals can leach out into the soil and food crops. If you have already used lumber that is treated, you can line it with plastic or another type of barrier.

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